Adapting to Change: How PostNet Beats the Competition

How the PostNet franchise adapted to the digital revolution to help small businesses thrive

The digital revolution has changed the way the world has done business, and PostNet has led the way in taking that change and running with it. We are lucky to have a great group of franchise owners who are, more often than not, business people who generate new ideas and new ways of doing things.

Take Ron Bradley, a longtime franchise owner in Asheville, North Carolina. Just four months after opening his own PostNet business, Bradley realized his customers’ needs were changing.

PostNet’s evolution into digital printing and marketing has helped boost franchise center revenue and allowed owners to adapt to change alongside their small business customers.

PostNet’s evolution into digital printing and marketing has helped boost franchise center revenue and allowed owners to adapt to change alongside their small business customers.

“My shipping was slow, so I decided to focus more on copying and printing,” he recalls. “Corporate was looking at the same thing, and three or four years later, they made it an official part of their corporate strategy. They tend to be out front.”

Co-founder Brian Spindel remembers that time well.

“In 22 years any company that doesn’t evolve loses relevance in the marketplace. We have seen some pretty big brands fail — Borders, Circuit City. We tell every franchisee who signs on that PostNet is going to evolve with changing consumer needs and technology. It has been a gradual, consistent evolution,” Brian says.

In the early 1990s PostNet was completely business-to-consumer focused, with almost all of our business coming from shipping and PostNet centers that were in grocery store shopping centers near seas of affluent rooftops. In the early 2000s a few things happened. UPS bought Mail Boxes Etc. and rebranded to The UPS Store. FedEx bought Kinko’s. The consolidation had begun.

“We had always represented those companies. We decided based on that and on the rise of internet shipping, we shouldn’t be completely reliant on retail pack-and-ship,” Brian says.

So, between 2003 and 2005, PostNet launched a new center design and decided to diversify strongly into business-to-business needs, learning to be just as flexible as the small businesses we sought to serve.

“We started developing technology for online print centers, for online development. Not only were franchisees asked to serve the end consumer, but they were also asked to diversify into serving the needs of businesses. And we have been getting better at that all the time,” Brian says.

It’s that type of evolution that will continue to drive our business model and franchise needs further into 2015. And with the added support of new executives, training materials and marketing support, the pool of talent and resources available to new center owners is growing.

Learn more

To learn more about PostNet’s efforts to support the small business community as well as the history of our business model, fill out a form to download our free franchise report and start a conversation. We look forward to meeting people who share our passion for helping small businesses, and hope to talk to you soon!If you’re interested in learning more about this award-winning opportunity.

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